With thanks to my old friend Dave for pointing this out to me.

If you go forward to around 2 hours 50 mins there is a piece about the author David Eagleman.

(This is a link to a BBC radio programme, so will disappear after a week unfortunately,  see my earlier comments on broadcasters approach to having their back catalogue online).

This author has published an iPad book which has lots of graphs / images and can be read from any chapter (he speaks of a Random Access Chapter device, which I assume is named to remind us of how RAM works). The book sounds like the kind of future I have been talking about for publishing, and in fact probably goes further than I have thought – the chapters can and will be updated as time goes on to ensure they remain relevant.

He also talks about the importance of sources for his work and highlights the use of hyperlinks to confirm what he is saying (which is exactly what bloggers do all the time, so I am not too surprised by this).

The interview is not a great one – would a BBC interviewer have asked any other author a question about how readers can trust what is being said in this new format – just the sort of material which will be replayed in half a century and people will laugh at how stupid the questions were as all books are made that way in 2060.

This blog is about the influence on publishing of what David Eagleman has done – you may also want to have a look at his website and get the book (Why The Net Matters: How the Internet Will Save Civilization) as the topic itself is quite interesting to (may blog about it once I have had a good look at what he says)

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Big Women – 4OD

November 23, 2010

4OD is probably one of my fav things in the entire world.

Everything Channel 4 (in the UK) has ever made is stored here and is accessible to stream to your PC.

Which is great, as the channel is owned by the government and therefore the citizens of the UK and we can watch what we have already paid for (and paid for again, as unlike the BBC, this channel sells advertising space as well) whenever we like.

As opposed to the BBC iPlayer system which only allows you to view things shown on one of its channels in the last week (or broadcast on its national radio networks). Which is fine for catch up, but not good for discovering hidden gems.

Something I found, watched and enjoyed the other day was Big Women, a four-part series about a woman’s publishing house, set up to promote feminist issues in the 1970s.

Great drama, great cast (including Daniela Nardini – who originally came to my attention in the BBCs amazing This Life series, which I loved watching while living in London while at uni) and a great service from Channel 4.

I found it interesting as drama and as a historical piece about the publishing industry.

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