A local newspaper in England is doing something innovative in a bid to handle the digital future.

I have got upset before about Murdoch‘s pay wall issue, but the more I read about the future of newspapers / print media the more I don’t see a revenue stream aside from a pay wall.

Altho the Rotherham Advertiser does appear to still be allowing access to some content on its regular website.

But what I really like is the app will allow you to see where the story happened using GPS – if you look at the story I have linked to there is a map showing exactly where it happened (which is genius and reflects on the web interaction with physical space I have covered before)

The Rotherham paper is apparently independent – ie not owned by a huge media group – but how long before other papers (belonging to the bigger groups) start doing this?

 

If you own a Kindle (which, along with the Apple iPad) is the future of publishing, you can now own a digital copy of my first novel for much less than the paperback RRP of £7.

Depending on the conversion rate of the dollar (the Kindle store is driven from the US at present) the UK price should be about £2.

In my opinion the future of books is digital, but to survive this format should cost much less than buying a physical book.

Bearing in mind there is no cost for printing, distribution from printer to store, no storage cost, no cost of owning the store, paying the staff to  stock the shelves and man the tills – there is no justifiable business model (apart from excessive greed, which I guess isn’t actually justifiable) which would allow publishers to charge the same for their eBooks as for the physical versions.

One of the key themes I cover in this blog is the future of publishing.

A reader of my blog (Thanks Dave! – don’t know how many blogs you subscribe to, but so far it seems I am in good company.) has sent me a link to Richard Branson’s blog which you can read here.

Richard knows what he is talking about – anyone who goes from running a business from a phone box / boot of his car (so the legend goes) to where he is today knows a thing or two.

His point about Virgin Records is important (as are his thoughts on diversification) and as I have probably mentioned before, publishers should learn the lessons from the music industry.

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