First up, a quick declaration of interest. I am (slowly) working on a novel which looks at the possibilities of life extension.

I almost didn’t read Suicide Club for that reason.

But, I am really glad I did choose to read the novel. Heng can certainly write. Her prose is a thing of beauty and she can really hit the emotional high and low notes when she chooses to.

The narrative carries you along from a 100th birthday party at the outset through the ongoing investigation following a minor road traffic accident, covering off some family history, which is revealed later, with a massive emotional impact, to not be quite what we were led to think it was.

Heng creates a world which is believable, the descriptions of the crowded streets of New York are suitably claustrophobic. But, an area which could have been improved upon is the wider world building. I was not totally clear about the social structures in this near future world. Exactly what difference there is between the lives of those who have longer life and those who do not? At one point the narrative makes reference to the general population “wouldn’t touch a lifer” but it is not really clear why this might be the case. Where would this level of fear come from?

There is reference to the areas outside New York being unpopulated due to low birth rates, but it is unclear why this is the case. While I do believe writers should show rather than tell, I think Heng could have painted the wider world around her narrative in a richer way and this would have enhanced what is already an excellent narrative.

There were also a couple of instances where I was not clear why people with the potential to live forever might not want to. I guess everyone has their own reasons, but if Heng could have made it much more apparent why someone would go to the lengths required in her imagined world of healthcare, I think this would have strengthened the narrative.

Overall, the minor issues I have with the story, do not deter from the narrative enough to make it anything less than a good novel. Heng is a good writer, her style brings you along and the emotional ups and downs are enjoyable.

Her vision of life extension is based in the world of medicine and health care improvements, while my part written novel is very much not in this vein (I was worried this book would be too close to my creation, which is why I was considering not reading Suicide Club).

If you are looking for a novel which is sci-fi light, but depicts a future world with a deep emotional story, Suicide Club could be just what you are looking for.

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Read this story about robots looking after children in Metro.

It is a good point and it is news that a futurologist said this.

And for some reason they refer to a 15 plus year old movie about a robot boy.

(Incidentally the only thing in this movie which I recall being in any way ground breaking for cinema was the idea sex robots, in this case Jude Law, would exist for women.)

In mu opinion it would have made more sense to refer to Issac Asimov’s short story Robbie which was the tale of a robot childminder first published in 1940 whom a child becomes attached to.

Exact same concept (AI is more Pinocchio) and 75+ years old.

For a country whose modern (western) history is based on the now discredited legal concept of ‘terra nullius’ the idea of invasion must be a deep rooted cultural threat, with a twist of ironic karma.

‘Tomorrow, when the war began’ is an Aussie movie which examines just such an invasion.

Mixed in with some teenage coming of age and a decent nod to American 80s cold war paranoia fuelled movie ‘Red Dawn’.

With the invasion happening on Australia Day the overtures to the previous invasion of the continent are strong shadows throughout the film.

The film starts as a teenage adventure in the wild, but quickly becomes a tale of teenagers finding how far they will go to battle the invaders.

The movie is well crafted, balancing action with character progression.

It fits into the history of Australian cinema which is edgy, questioning and watchable – think ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’, ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’, ”Walkabout’ or even ‘Two Hands or ‘Strange Planet’.

In celebration of the life and work of Douglas Adams, writer of the Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy, today is Towel Day.

His works of fiction are enjoyed across the world and it is fitting to his sense of irreverent fun the world remembers him in this way.

More: towelday.org

To say Reynolds latest novel is a procedural detective novel is, while technically true, a vast under selling of Elysium Fire.

The novel is set in a cluster of habitats known as the Glitter Band and follows a number of Panoply operatives who are entrusted with protecting the participatory democracy which sees every citizen voting on every issue which faces their society.

Each habitat, it turns out, can leave the democratic union if they choose. And a rabble rouser, who is not exactly open about how much a part of the establishment he is, is stirring up dissent and encouraging breakaways.

So the set up feels a lot like brexit – Glit-xit, in this scenario. I was worried about where this was going to take us.

On the plus side, after the set up Reynolds leaves the Brexit analogy alone (unless he continues it and i am too uninformed / he is too subtle, for me to know it’s there).

In parallel to the politics is a story about brain implants going wrong and melting their hosts. This is starting to reach the levels where citizens might panic if the media made the links between the deaths.

Reynolds creates a narrative which is at once compelling and totally immersive.

His creation has shadows of the Culture novels of Iain M Banks. But any well written future set society is bound to have parallels with the Culture. And observing the similarities should be seen as a compliment to Reynolds.

There follows an imaginative narrative as the operatives unravel the deaths and find links to the politics of their age.

This is a great read for any sci fi lovers and if you have enjoyed any of Reynolds work before, this will in no way disappoint.

For some reason no one has made movies of the following sci fi source material (books or graphic novels) and in my humble opinion they really should as the material has hit movie written all over it.

Special effects have moved on so far, the difficulties of any of these could be overcome to make a spectacular film:

Tiger, Tiger by Alfred Bester – one of my favourite sci fi books of all time. A rip roaring rampage of revenge. Gully Foyle is left for dead in the opening salvos of a war between the inner and outer planets of the solar system. Oh and people can self teleport, which is a genius idea well used in this narrative. His path for revenge takes him across the solar system.

On the Flip Side by Nicholas Fisk – a story about people being able to step across to another dimension by the power of thought – and what the world left behind is like.

Neuromancer by Gibson – the novel which launched cyber punk is a delightful read from start to finish. And a cracking thriller which would make an epic cinematic experience.

Look to Windward by Iain M Banks – a simply beautiful novel with so much scope for some beautiful cinematography as the broad canvas of the Culture painted by Banks is played out across this enigmatic book. There is also a fabulous thriller plot which bounds along at a perfect pace for the narrative.

The Ballad of Halo Jones by Alan Moore – if you could skip over most of book one in the intro (like the first harry potter film skips half the book in about the opening 10 mins) and then cover book 2 and 3 in the actual movie. Book 2 of this graphic novel series is an interstellar cruise from the point of view of the waiting staff while book 3 is a sad tale of life in a universe where the only way to make money is join the army and wage war across the stars, a severally depressing view of war (which in the closing chapters borrows significantly from The Forever War by Joe Haldeman). Halo is also a feminist icon and a trailblazer in the representation of women in comic books.

If you can think of any other sci fi novels or graphic novels which should become movies please comment.

Literature literally loves lovers.

Of all ages – from those first flushes of Romeo and Juliet to middle aged lovers such as Antony and Cleopatra – love across human life has always been a focus of plays, poetry and novels.

There is an entire genre of, in my opinion, trashy romantic novels which seem to still sell.

At the more literary end of this genre is Bridgett Jones and her diary (I only made it about 2/3 of the way through the first one before I had to put it down) which appeal to so many.

There is also the slightly darker end of the market, popularised by 50 Shades of Grey.

There is love in many areas of literature, including unrequited love, The Great Gatsby being a tour de force in the lengths some will go to for their unrequited love.

Well, whatever type of literary love you love, today is the annual day of love, so think about those literary lovers and show your real lover just how you feel about them (maybe with the gift of a book about love)…

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